New Post Tomorrow

I have a new job that has kept me busy the past few days. 

I will be back with a new post tomorrow. I have something in mind.

In the mean time I’d like to direct you to the new Recommendations part of the Blog. In the right column there is a link to a page that will give you a nice long list of reading and watching material—if you are so inclined.

Hope that helps.

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4 Comments

  1. I have a recommendation, too. It is a link that draws connection between William Blake and visual culture especially Superhero comics~~~ (this one is for you, Rob)

    “ImageText, as a journal dedicated to comics and critical theory, seems like an odd place to publish essays opening up this maddening, but unmistakably literary, vortex. The visual images in the illuminated books might correlate to the gothic sensibility of contemporary superheroes with their bulging muscles and gigantic stature, as Peter Ackroyd suggests in his biography of Blake.[3] There is also something deeper, however, a Broglioian-Blakean-Deleuzian mole tunneling beneath contemporary comic culture, driving creators to aesthetic innovation with visions of brimstone and apocalyptic nightmares contesting the bourgeois dream life of spandex-clad defenders of the status quo.”

    http://www.english.ufl.edu/imagetext/archives/v3_2/

    Here’s an excerpt from the editor’s introduction:

    http://www.english.ufl.edu/imagetext/archives/v3_2/introduction.shtml

    “Two hundred and fifty years after William Blake’s birth, his work continues to have a very strong visual resonance. Artists and academics were asked to trace that resonance in the 2005 Clouds and Vision exhibition at Lambeth. The show reinterpreted Blake’s vision for the contemporary audience with the intended purpose of illustrating his continuing relevance. David Burrows created an installation entitled The Sick Rose (figure 1) in which several felt roses twined together have thin strands of material emerging from the center of the bud. It seems like the rose is throwing up. The roses are sick, but they are also plastic, manufactured, indicative of a culture that espouses spongy beauty and synthetic substances. Even Burrows’ sickness is sick, colored bright pastels anesthetizing us from the reality of illness but also from the reality of the roses’ beauty. In Burrows’ hands, Blake’s poem becomes a critique of contemporary global capital and its encroachment upon all aspects of daily life. The sickness of the rose has become an autoimmune disease – the very substances we use to help our bodies fight off infection and illness have started attacking us.[1] The rose is sick in the same way that we are all sick: awash in the achievements of civilization and the seeming triumph of the modern capitalist state, we turn inwards with iPods and laptop computers and build citadels out of preemptive assaults on nations suspected of having biological, chemical, or nuclear weapons. Plastic and felt replace flesh, and the dark satanic mills churn out ceaseless mechanical automatons armed only with their cash flow and their fear.”

    [1][1] Jacques Derrida defines autoimmunity, in an interview with Giovanna Borradori, as “that strange behaviour where a living being, in quasi-suicidal fashion, ‘itself’ works to destroy its ‘own’ immunity, to immunize itself against its own protection,” and he argues in “Faith and Knowledge: Two Sources of ‘Religion at the Limits of Reason Alone'” that democratic governments, by acting democratically, lead open themselves up to ruin and destruction (“Autoimmunity” 94).

    Derrida, Jacques. “Autoimmunity: Real and Symbolic Suicides.” Trans. Giovanni Borradori. Philosophy in a Time of Terror: Dialogues With Jürgen Habermas and Jacques Derrida. Chicago: U of Chicago P, 2003. 85-136.

    Looking forward to more, Katie, but pace yourself….. this is deep shit~~~

  2. I want to look at this quote for a second and pull a word from disease terminology.

    “The rose is sick in the same way that we are all sick: awash in the achievements of civilization and the seeming triumph of the modern capitalist state, we turn inwards with iPods and laptop computers and build citadels out of preemptive assaults on nations suspected of having biological, chemical, or nuclear weapons.”

    This brought to mind the term “endemic” and what that means for us as a society. “Awash in the achievements of civilization”—this society that we have built, these achievements that are not so wonderful but are actually making us sick (and not slowly either)—it is more than just an epidemic or even a pandemic—this disease, the societal disease, has become endemic in humans. Endemic virtually means when a disease has occurred so often in a population that it becomes engrained in the DNA of that population and they eventually either die out or become immune.

    At this point we consider ourselves immune, but–we aren’t really….

    But then this concept of autoimmunity is both at once baffling and making perfect sense to me. We are immune, but are working to destroy our immunity to become immune against our protection. Wow.

    I’m gonna have to chew on this a little longer—but thank you for the links—really interesting stuff….

  3. Another interesting “stuff” item~~ you probably already know this but your readers may not. William Blake illustrated for both Shelly and Milton.

  4. A good place to look at some of Blake’s paintings is artcyclopedia.com — if anyone wants an example of what we’re discussing.


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